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VE6RWP

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VE6RWP last won the day on December 22 2019

VE6RWP had the most liked content!

About VE6RWP

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  • First name
    Ron
  • Nickname
    VE6RWP
  • Military service
    No

Amateur Radio

  • License class (USA licencees)
    Outside USA
  • License class (non-USA licensees)
    Advanced
  • License year
    2017

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  1. I agree, the hobby is not as big as it was. There are less people interested in it and less young people in the hobby. It is a niche hobby and not for everyone, we just need to figure out how to find the right audience and get Radio in front of them to gain their interest. After all it is all about the marketing. 🙂 There is still a need as has been exhibited time and time again. With the new First responder radio system here in Alberta and similar systems in other locations, HAM Radio will not be needed as much however it will still be needed at times. All those new systems did not help Porto Rico when the Hurricane wiped out it's infrastructure and HAM Radio was set up to communicate through out the territory. HAM radio still plays a factor in California and the wild fires. Auxiliary Communications / supplemental communications is still needed from time to time. (See we are slowly changing the name in these cases) Given that, for those of us into EmComm, it is better to be ready and not needed than needed and not ready.
  2. Did you get your signs? I know it is a busy time of year, I am just curious what they look like.
  3. Thanks for the heads up. The only wire I could find long enough was 22 AWG. It will do for a start and I will keep the wattage down. Heavier wire will be on my list of improvements as I journey forward. Luckily the little kids have all grown up and moved away so the only one who can get into trouble, initially, would be me. 🙂
  4. I just acquired a Kenwood TS-450SAT and I am thinking of setting up a speaker wire 20 M inverted V dipole as a first antenna. It is inexpensive, relatively easy to build and fits in my yard. Is there anything I should be aware of when setting this up? This is my first foray into HF.
  5. I do like it. Where are you getting it printed? Can I use the design to have my own printed up?
  6. Just as Volunteer fire fighters do what professionals do, and Volunteer search and rescue the same, Some professional radio operators are those who work on ships. They maintain equipment and pass messages between ships and shore. They are not broadcasters who play music the radio operators are the guys behind the scene keeping the broadcast radios running. There job is to keep the broadcast messages on the air, nothing more. I see this hobby, this band of volunteers, as those who do the same as the professional radio operators and more. We experiment, we develop new methods of passing messages form place to place. We are there when there are not enough professionals to do what needs to be done. Not everyone is into emergency message passing, but not everyone is into earth-moon-earth communications, or satellite, or bouncing signals off of meteorite trails. It all boils down to passing messages the best we can with the technology we have available at the time, for practice, for personal reasons, for experimenting or for times of need and public service. That is just me, I am new in the hobby and full of ideals, I hope I never get over it.....:-).
  7. The trick is not to change the root organizations names, but rebrand to the average person. Change ARES to VRES (Volunteer Radio Emergency Service), tell a story of how we still are essential when all else fails and show all the Volunteering we have done in the past from our Volunteer involvement during 9/11, in the fires in California, helping Puerto Rico, the Floods and fires in Canada, etc. Re-branding is serious work but we have the raw material already to tell the story. Look at "Low Dose Asprin" is was originally "Baby Asprin" until it was associated with Ryse Syndrome in children. Bayer spent some time and some money and now "Low Dose Asprin" is branded as a life saver for people who have heart attacks, almost no one remembers the Baby Asprin fiasco nor do they remember where the initial research was done on the drug. Society today is so market driven that if you tell the new story enough times people will start to forget the old one. So I guess we really do not need to change the name of the hobby, as we who are in the hobby know what it means, we just need to change the public perception of the hobby. Our public face in emergency situations is ARES. It needs a new image and a new brand. Starting there would be a smaller, more achievable, better tasting option to the organizations that have a vested interest in the Amateur part of the name. Piggy backing on the "Volunteer" perception is the easier way of changing that association the public has of us as the rhetoric starts talking about volunteers and stops mentioning Amateur. Anyone else have any thoughts on this?
  8. I am looking at two of the more successful "amateur" organizations. Volunteer fire fighters and Volunteer Search and Rescue. Neither group has the issues Amateur radio does and I think it comes down to 3 things. The name "Volunteer", their dedication to training and their dedication to a professional attitude. I am sure we have groups that meet the last two items but cannot get past the first one. Hence the "Oh they are just a bunch of amateurs" comments I keep seeing about ARES and HAM Operators in General. You mentioned "Doctors without Borders", They have High training standards, High professionality and no "Amateur" in their name. People know they are volunteering their skills and they are trained Doctors. Branding ARES as a highly trained professional organization will never happen with the connotation of the word amateur and it being the first component of our name. I too am interested in other suggestions for a name as we have the same issues here in Canada.
  9. It used to be that an "Amateur" was someone who was not paid for something they did. The Olympics were Amateur Sports. The best of the best but no one got paid to train and compete. The definition of amateur was:"noun 1. a person who engages in a pursuit, especially a sport, on an unpaid rather than a professional basis." Then somewhere along the line a second definition was added: "2. a person who is incompetent or inept at a particular activity." this seems to be the more accepted definition. Should we be renaming ourselves to "Volunteer Radio Operators" to shake that definition of incompetence from our hobbies name?
  10. There are Search and Rescue groups that are amateurs and they are used as "professional" organizations. What is it they do that ARES does not? Perhaps it is the level of training and commitment. They are a story that ARES as an organization needs to study and see how they go to the level of reputation they have. I was at a Search and Rescue Volunteer Association of Canada Conference with our local ARES and radio club letting them know what we can provide for them as a service and the one thing that stuck out the most is that they train for their volunteerism much harder than we do. They have certifications for all aspects of their hobby, High angle rescue, helicopter evacuation of a body, advanced rope rescue etc. We tend to get a certificate or ticket to operate and a couple of ICS courses and that seems to be it. Maybe we need to look at the ARES training and be more specific so that we can certify the skills we use to show competency. This however is a bigger discussion than a quick note, but it is perhaps one that needs to be started at a much higher level like ARRL and RAC or the ITU. The big question is what would gain us the respect that we have apparently lost.
  11. When it was Porto Rico, the ARRL was asked by the Red Cross and a call went out. But the Bahamas is not a U.S. protectorate or state and maybe this is the basis for the decision not to put out the call for HAMS to help? I am not an ARRL member so I can't ask them what's up but a member needs to ask what the reasoning is. Maybe no-one asked for help?
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